Wakefield Trinity owner backs players who collectively failed to take a knee | The Guardian

‘There is no way we will isolate someone for religious beliefs’Trinity linked arms and stood in unison in front of Wigan playersThe owner of a Super League club whose players collectively decided against taking a knee has denied anyone involved is racist, insisting the decision was made to stand in solidarity with a player who said his religious beliefs prohibited him from making the stance.Wakefield Trinity attracted criticism after their players did not kneel before their game against Wigan, with the squad instead opting to link arms and stand in unison. The likes of Israel Folau of Catalans have also not taken a knee since Super League’s resumption, but Wakefield’s owner, Michael Carter, has stressed his players were keen to send their own anti-racism message while also supporting those who did not feel comfortable kneeling.“We have at least one player who was adamant that their religion did not allow him to kneel for anyone but God,” Carter told the Guardian. “I didn’t feel that was open to question and having spoken with one player privately, he had concerns about the reaction Israel Folau had received to the point he was actively considering standing down. Related: Super League roundup: St Helens thrash Leeds to keep heat on Wigan Continue reading…

  • ‘There is no way we will isolate someone for religious beliefs’
  • Trinity linked arms and stood in unison in front of Wigan players

The owner of a Super League club whose players collectively decided against taking a knee has denied anyone involved is racist, insisting the decision was made to stand in solidarity with a player who said his religious beliefs prohibited him from making the stance.

Wakefield Trinity attracted criticism after their players did not kneel before their game against Wigan, with the squad instead opting to link arms and stand in unison. The likes of Israel Folau of Catalans have also not taken a knee since Super League’s resumption, but Wakefield’s owner, Michael Carter, has stressed his players were keen to send their own anti-racism message while also supporting those who did not feel comfortable kneeling.

“We have at least one player who was adamant that their religion did not allow him to kneel for anyone but God,” Carter told the Guardian. “I didn’t feel that was open to question and having spoken with one player privately, he had concerns about the reaction Israel Folau had received to the point he was actively considering standing down.

Related: Super League roundup: St Helens thrash Leeds to keep heat on Wigan

Continue reading…


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